International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union

   A trade union that was formed in the United States in 1900 due to appalling working conditions in garment factories known as sweatshops. It was chartered by the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and started with approximately 2,000 members. In 1909, the union conducted a strike of 20,000 shirtwaist workers known as the Big Strike and, in 1910, held a strike of 60,000 cloakmakers called the Great Revolt. The strikes ended in a settlement known as the Protocol of Peace granting workers a fifty-hour work week, higher wages, double pay for overtime, better working conditions, and the closed-shop concept whereby employers could only hire union members. The ILGWU merged in 1995 with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union (ACTWU) to form the group UNITE and, in 2004, merged with the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union (HERE) to form UNITE HERE.

Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry. .

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  • INTERNATIONAL LADIES GARMENT WORKERS UNION — (ILGWU), U.S. trade union that represented hundreds of thousands of apparel industry workers over the course of the 20th century. Founded by 11 male Jewish tailors on June 3, 1900, the ILGWU relied on a largely female rank and file membership for …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union — The International Ladies Garment Workers Union was once one of the largest labor unions in the United States, one of the first U.S. unions to have a primarily female membership, and a key player in the labor history of the 1920s and 1930s. The… …   Wikipedia

  • International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union —       former industrial union in the United States and Canada that represented workers in the women s clothing industry. When the ILGWU was formed in 1900, most of its members were Jewish immigrants employed in sweatshops i.e., small… …   Universalium

  • International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) — Former industrial union in the U.S. and Canada that represented workers in the women s clothing industry. When it was formed in 1900, most of its members were Jewish immigrants working in sweatshops. Successful ILGWU strikes in New York in… …   Universalium

  • Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union — ▪ American union       former union of garment and apparel workers in the United States and Canada. It was formed in 1976 by the merger of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), a large union representing workers in the men s… …   Universalium

  • Textile Workers Union of America — (TWUA)    A union formed in the United States in 1939 by Southern textile workers. It later merged, in 1976, with the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) to form the Amalgamated Clothing and Textiles Workers Union (ACTWU). In 1995, the …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • International Typographical Union — Infobox Union| name= ITU country= United States affiliation= members= full name= International Typographical Union native name= instituted= May 3, 1852 current= head= dissolved date= December 31, 1986 dissolved state= Merged into merged into= CWA …   Wikipedia

  • union — /yoohn yeuhn/, n. 1. the act of uniting two or more things. 2. the state of being united. 3. something formed by uniting two or more things; combination. 4. a number of persons, states, etc., joined or associated together for some common purpose …   Universalium

  • international — internationality, n. internationally, adv. /in teuhr nash euh nl/, adj. 1. between or among nations; involving two or more nations: international trade. 2. of or pertaining to two or more nations or their citizens: a matter of international… …   Universalium

  • workers — (as used in expressions) foreign workers Industrial Workers of the World International Ladies Garment Workers Union Kurdistan Workers Party Russian Social Democratic Workers Party Transport and General Workers Union United Mine Workers of America …   Universalium

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